Workflow: Blogging

While participating in #satchat last Saturday, Dr. Reshan Richards offered a concise master class in the how and why of blogging.  I embedded his tweets below with some brief contextualizations / explanations.


By establishing rules for himself — “format and schedule” — Reshan re-launched his blogging practice.

Focus allows side projects, like blogging, to feel manageable and not chew up too much time.

What gets scheduled gets done.

Constraints allow side projects to fit into crowded calendars.

As we learn in the gym or on the track, reps add up.  And, in creative practice, one of the key, though counterintuitive, insights is that habitual (i.e. predictable / boring) practice allows creative practice to thrive.

This is the point Twyla Tharp makes in The Creative Habit . . . and Austin Kleon drives home in an evergreen blog post called “Something Small Everyday.”   (See his related blackout poem below.)

something-small-daily-cropped-500x766

Beyond habits, Reshan is big on internal motivation.  As I heard him recently say in an as-yet-unpublished interview, “any activities done as part of a learning experience should be done with intrinsic motivation. Human beings of course need boundaries and rules to feel safe, but they should also be given flexibility and understanding when a task is not complete.”  It didn’t surprise me, therefore, when he said:

Also, it didn’t surprise me when he said:

You get ideas by capturing them. When I was young, I marveled at the artists and writers I met.  They always seemed to have so many more ideas than everybody else.  A simple drive to a bagel store could yield five new poems, six new photographs, three new essay ideas, nine new short film projects . . .

Now that I’m older and have several hundred thousand words under my own belt, I know that everyone has ideas.  But people who traffic in ideas, people who need to generate lots of them, are simply more disciplined about capturing their ideas. They have more ideas because they keep more ideas.

Last, though certainly not least, is gratitude.

Check out Reshan’s payback / payforward at www.constructivisttoolkit.com.  It’s a wonderful assortment of fresh ideas, new every weekday.  Leave him a comment somewhere and let him know what you think.

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